January 2021

New Year, there’s something about that idea of resetting and starting afresh that provides some positivity in mid-winter. The current restrictions narrow the focus to what’s close and nearby, though to be honest, I always feel like January starts that way, like throwing a stone in a pond you start at the centre and (hopefully)Continue reading “January 2021”

Wintering Littoralis Rock Pipit

One of the highlights of a clear the head/good for the soul three hour wander along the Boulmer to Howick stretch of coast in good low winter sun today was stumbling across a colour-ringed Rock Pipit, one of several; feeding on the insect life along the high tide mark. Luckily I was able to photographContinue reading “Wintering Littoralis Rock Pipit”

November 2020

October ended in blustery, wet weather smashing in waves from the Atlantic, not the best birding weather for the East Coast. Birding the final couple of days of the month had a distinct wintry feel as a result. The half dozen Tundra Bean Geese remained in the fields between Longhirst Flash and Bothal Pond. SearchingContinue reading “November 2020”

American Buff-bellied Pipit 18 November

After finishing work late morning, I headed to Newbiggin with Bubo and wandered up the North Beach checking the pipits and wagtails for anything interesting, 8 Rock Pipits, 5 Pied Wagtails and the Grey Wagtail were the sum total. With ominous dark clouds coming from the west I picked my way back to the carContinue reading “American Buff-bellied Pipit 18 November”

Late September and October 2020

The evening of 27 September felt like a good time to take a brief look around the Woodhorn Church Field and Hedge. Earlier in the year the builders from a small site opposite had dumped a fair amount of spoil at the north end presumably to reduce the flooding that occurs through winter. It wasContinue reading “Late September and October 2020”

The Pit Top

One of the personal highlights of 2020 for me has been the realisation that the partially wooded hill that sits on the east side of my home village has some real potential when it comes to visible migration. Early on in the lockdown when there was a fair amount of social media chatter as birdersContinue reading “The Pit Top”

Tundra Ringed Plovers

Late Spring in Northumberland often sees movements of Arctic-breeding waders making a rapid leap beyond the local birds that have already settled into the breeding cycle to areas far to the north that will have retained their snow until much later in the year. Ringed Plovers are one such wader and the birds moving throughContinue reading “Tundra Ringed Plovers”